Boston Red Sox

Goodbye, David Price

David Price’s postseason start went about as well as the Titanic’s maiden voyage. And much like the Titanic, I can’t see how there will be a sequel.

If you didn’t see this coming, I envy your life of blissful ignorance. But even I didn’t think it would be this bad. Yes, David Price had a 10.34 ERA against the Yankees going into this game. And yes, his postseason career has been nothing short of disastrous, including that time he gave up two home runs to David Ortiz in one 2013 postseason game. But tonight, Price exceeded my expectations, and not in a good way.

In his first postseason start since 2016, Price didn’t even last two innings, giving up a pair of homers and an RBI over 1 2/3. He only faced 10 batters, allowing 3 hits and walking two on 42 pitches. For the first time in his regular and postseason career, he didn’t strike out a single batter. In 18 postseason appearances, he now has a 5.28 ERA in 75 innings over his career. His 6.03 ERA as a starter is 3rd-worst in postseason history.

It’s not like we haven’t seen David Price fail before, but this was pretty spectacular. And honestly, I’d be happy to never see him again. This man is a headcase, hypersensitive and snarky to the media when he has nothing to back up his attitude. 11 of his 27 home runs allowed this season were given up to the Yankees. And when you’re a starter who knows you have a terrible bullpen behind you, you need to be able to throw at least 5 solid innings. We’ve never gotten that from Price in the postseason, and I highly doubt we ever will.

What separates any regular ol’ ballplayer from a Hall of Famer is their ability to perform in high-stress situations. If you can’t get it done in the postseason, nay, if you flame out so disastrously every chance you get, you will be remembered for that. And only that. There will be no glory for you.

I tried to root for you, David. I said it last winter that you deserved a fresh start. I was patient when you gave up 5 homers in a single Yankee game. And I was thrilled when you did so well after the All-Star break. But your deciding game was this one, and you showed us what many of us already knew to be true: that you don’t have what it takes. Fool us once, shame on you. Fool us a million times, shame on us.


Photo: Yahoo Sports

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